Tag Archives: ipad

Is Google Glass dead? I don’t think so, and here’s why

Subtitle: A short essay in which Kelsey proves she is an extremophile of Sci-Fi literature

People love to make predictions of success and failure. Star Trek is commonly cited as one of the first tv shows to predict the flip phone, ipad, and smart phone. ‘Back to the Future II’ predicted the hoverboard, Arthur C. Clarke first conceived of GPS, and Ray Bradbuy, in ‘Farenheight 451’ predicted earbuds, giant TVs, and mechanical hounds…and cats*. Compared to all that, digital glasses (a la William Gibson’s ‘Neuromancer’) seems like a slam dunk. Plus, Google is like the Pixar of the tech world. They’ve has had so many wins, how could they fail? Yet, two years and thousands of selfies later, the predicted revolutionary impact of Google Glass now seems to be going the way of the Segway.

Dronte_17th_Century_Segway

Restored 17th C. sketch of Raphus cucullatus by Dronte (Wikimedia)

However, like the Segway, Google has not tapped into the true market for the glass: the primary (raw materials) and secondary (manufacturing) economic sectors. Stay with me here and I promise this leads back to Paleontology. How handy would it be for an inventory screen to pop up in the right upper corner of a person’s vision? Or for a logging company to keep track of where and how they are cutting down trees? You could even keep a record of what each tree looked like before. A surgeon used the Glass to record his procedure, but in the future I can see EMTs sending reports and pictures of the patient to the hospital before they arrive, so the staff are better prepared.

No one would judge a person wearing Glass to inventory or save a person’s life. Instead of trying Glass out in the shower or at a wine bar, we as a society should focus on what technology can contribute to humanity, not how it can enhance a Facebook status.

“Really, Captain, I don’t feel silly at all wearing this…” (ST DS9)

Currently, the University of Texas at Austin’s Non-Vertebrate Paleontology Laboratory (NPL) has a team of volunteers using three Glasses to conduct a cursory inventory of their 3.5 MILLION fossils. Chase, one of the employees at NPL, calculated that it would take him 90 YEARS to catalog all the fossils currently at NPL the “traditional way.” The pictures produced by Glass are sharp enough that they are already being used for reference. It’s a damn good start.

If the 2015 Consumer Electronic Show (CES) is any indication, wearable tech is the way of the future, but a future that must be as useful as it is flashy. Gadgets can’t just be useful for the consumer market, the have to blend into the background of a “normal” life. However, in an industrial or scientific context, normal is shoved out the window in favor of innovative tech, and most importantly, gadgets that make people’s lives easier.

So, there you have it. Google Glass is not a Segway (which, by the way, has been adopted in large manufacturing facilities and by security companies), but a useful tool for the future.

And don’t forget: there are plenty of wrong futuristic predictions as well.

*And let’s not get into how accurate Aldous Huxley’s ‘Brave New World’ turned out to be. I’m just glad that fannypacks aren’t nearly as popular as he predicted.